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Bayonet Golf Club

1 McClure Way
Seaside, CA
93955
831-899-7271

Rates: $60 – $140
(Includes cart fee)

Traveling north along the Pacific Coast Highway from the resort community of Monterey, California lies the City of Seaside. In the heart of this city, the U.S. Army purchased a tract of land to be used as a training facility, which was, named Fort Ord in honor of General Edward Otho Cresap Ord – a famed Civil War Veteran.

It was upon this great land that General Robert B. McClure constructed the Bayonet Golf Course in 1954. Bayonet was named after the 7th Infantry “Light Fighter” Division (nicknamed the “Bayonet Division.”) It has been said that General McClure was a “left-handed” golfer with an all too common fade. The General managed to effectively reduce his handicap with a little creative architecture in the design of the Bayonet Golf Course. Holes #11-#15, a series of sharp doglegs, widely known as “Combat Corner” are interrupted only by a 226-yard uphill par 3.

Due to Bayonet’s initial acclaim, Fort Ord decided to expand the course and in 1964 a second 18-hole championship course was officially opened – Black Horse. The course was named in honor of the 11th Calvary Regiment (nicknamed “Black Horse”) which was stationed across the Bay at the Presidio of Monterey from 1919-1940.

In conjunction with the Defense Realignment Closure, the Fort Ord Military Base was ordered closed. Under this legislation, the military was required to sell the base to local municipalities.
On January 16, 1997, after being purchased by the City of Seaside, BSL Golf Corporation was selected as the management firm to oversee the day to day activities of Bayonet and Black Horse Golf Courses.

Under the management of BSL, Bayonet and Black Horse are gaining more and more recognition. They have quickly emerged as popular public and championship courses, and they continue to hold their place amongst the best golf courses on the Monterey Peninsula. Both courses are steeped in rich tradition, and have played host to PGA Tour greats such as Palmer, Nicklaus, and Watson, as well as several U.S. Presidents and foreign dignitaries.

Previously only enjoyed by military personnel stationed at Fort Ord, these magnificent courses have only recently been opened to the public, and many who would never have had the opportunity to play them finally have that chance.
Course Designer

General Robert B. McClure